Journal #26 – Newsweek and Economist coverage of N. Korea

Read the original articles from Newsweek and The Economist linked in the two posts below. The Economist is the leading international news magazine, and Newsweek is arguably the second most prominent news magazine in the United States.

1. How has the international media responded to North Korea’s missile launch?

The international community has responded in the way North Korea wanted them to act: surprised and fearful. North Korea cannot survive by itself and needs help from countries, and the only way it can recieve any help without a change of regime is by threatening with brinkmanship. Although many people say the missile launch was a failure,  North Korea considered it a success because it raised international awareness of the North’s danger. This has only fueled Kim Jong Il’s ambition to become a more powerful and influencial nation. 

2. In what ways might international perceptions of North Korea impact how the world views South Korea?

The international perceptions of North Korea is important because South and North Korea are very close. The nationality of both nations is the same, Korean, and ignorant or just naive people can forget or get confused with one another. This poses big problems for South Korea because people might think that the South is as dangerous as the North and might possibly avoid doing any trade or business.

3. Has anyone ever asked you “which Korea are you from, North or South?” What does that question reveal on the part of the speaker?

I have been asked several times whether I was from North or South Korea in the U.S.  I do not think it reveals anything about the questioner except that they do not know much about the international community. South Korea is a relatively big country, in economic and social terms, while North Korea is an isolated country known for being unpredictable and threatening. It should be obvious that most if not all Koreans are from South Korea, but that is not the case.
North and South Korea 

North and South Korea

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